Review: Dawn of Rebellion by Michelle Lynn

Book 1 of Dawn of Rebellion

                                                           

Title: Dawn of Rebellion

Author: Michelle Lynn

Genre: Adventure, Dystopia, Young Adult

Year of Publication: 2013

Published by Creativia

Series: Dawn of Rebellion

Rating: 3/5 stars

Ever since I’ve begun writing book reviews, I heard about books and genres which are popular among different categories of readers. Because I’m a curious person, I’m experimenting with various genres to discover what I like and what is not quite my cup of tea. Therefore; today I’m going to review the first instalment in Michelle Lynn’s young adult dystopian adventure trilogy entitled Dawn of Rebellion, which was sent to me by the author through Twitter.

In short, this is the story of two teenage sisters (Dawn and Gabby) who live in a dystopian and segregated version of London, where soldiers march on the streets, people are divided into three classes of citizens, and if you’re breaking the law, you are sent to the colonies to work in some kind of concentration camps. There, you are tortured or put to death in “the box” which made me think of a gas chamber. After Gabby steals a bracelet for her sister’s birthday and the authorities decide to send her to the colonies, Dawn along with Gabby’s boyfriend (Drew) embark on a risky journey to save Gabby. The adventures that await all three teens will shape both sisters and teach each one of them to develop sides of their personalities they didn’t know they had. They will also meet new friends and discover secrets buried in their past.

Though I have a complicated relationship with young adult novels, I admire the strong devotion and love the two sisters have for each other despite their totally opposed personalities: Dawn is quiet and studious, while Gabby is outgoing, confident and stubborn. The memories they have of their childhood and parents made me sad and sorry for the abandonment from their parents’ part and the way those memories are narrated broke my heart. This novel also gave me some strange vibe because of the constant presence of the soldiers, the gloomy atmosphere and pure terror lurking in the shadows. I found the adventures interesting, suspenseful and very realistic with all the beatings and the story of how the US lost its identity. The writing was pretty good, though I had some trouble understanding some British words I’ve never heard before.

The story is narrated through three perspectives (Dawn, Gabby and Drew) of which I personally preferred Gabby’s because she is more independent, stronger and more courageous than Dawn, but Dawn learns to get out of her comfort zone too with Drew’s and her new friends’ help. When it comes to romance, it’s not really the focus of the story, but this doesn’t mean that it’s non-existent. The thing that I didn’t particularly like was the moment when Drew couldn’t make up his mind who he really loved – Dawn or Gabby?

In the end, I have some mixed feeling about this book and about dystopias in general because they are not something I particularly enjoy reading, but, on the other hand, the author did a pretty good job depicting both the oppressive fictional British regime and the Texan rebels who still called themselves Americans.

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