Series I Won’t Be Finishing

Besides reading, I also love watching book-tubers talking in front of their cameras about the books they own or got from the library. Though I enjoy wrap-ups and book unhauls, I’m also interested in learning about books they didn’t like or series they are not going to finish. It’s no secret that I’m not a big fan of book series, especially those long ones because life is pretty short and I have to do a thorough selection of the volumes I’m really excited to pick up and hopefully enjoy. I know that there are some amazing series out there for every age group, but the book industry is also full of volumes I’m not interested in or I didn’t feel the urge to continue reading. Personally, I don’t believe in unpopular opinions because everyone has the right to speak one’s mind in a decent manner without tearing the book apart or insulting its author. Therefore, the six series I’m going to talk about in this article are not necessarily bad, but rather not my cup of tea.

The genres of these first instalments range from young adult dystopian to adult mystery or contemporary. I bought some of these volumes in eBook format, while others were received from authors for an honest review. The ratings for these books are between 2 and 3 stars.

1.. Gates of Heaven (Balthasar Family Saga) by Pamita Rao is a fantasy adventure series set on a planet called Myrth where the world comprises of medieval kingdoms conquered by King Creed, but he wants to rule other realms too; therefore he plans to kill his son, Prince Neelahaim, in order to find the Gates of Heaven. However, the gates reveal themselves only to the chosen ones and let them pass through. Will Alaira, Horace and their friends manage to keep the child safe and fulfil the prophecy? This is a high fantasy book with dark and elemental magic whose end was gripping and for me, it read like a stand-alone.

2. Dawn of Rebellion by Michelle Lynn is a young adult series set in a dystopian world where Britain is an empire again and the US is its colony. After Gabby is sent to the colonies for shoplifting, her sister Dawn and Gabby’s love interest (Drew) go on a mission to save her. We follow three perspectives and we get a glimpse of the totalitarian society, the US’s lost identity and the family secrets the two siblings didn’t know about. Though this story gave me the creeps, I can’t say that post-apocalyptic dystopias are my thing.

3. Maggie Elisabeth Harrington by D.J. Swykert is a fictional story based on the life of a real person. Sounds interesting, right? Well, the first chapters were enjoyable, but the young protagonist who lived in Central Mine (Michigan) began to be very annoying due to her repetitive thoughts about the world and the people around her. Though this book was pretty short, I deeply regret reading it because it was a waste of time and energy.

4. Wild Child by Mike wells was a pretty big disappointment for me because a young adult thriller from the author who writes ‘unputdownable’ espionage books sounded great, but… it actually wasn’t. Now, the idea of two teenagers finding a strange green substance that heals wounds and strengthens the body is a pretty cool concept and if you add two CIA agents who are interested in the location of the miraculous water, it’s even more intriguing. However, I didn’t like the story that much and I’m not planning to continue this trilogy. The characters were thinly fleshed out and Briana Fox was so annoying that I didn’t care too much what happened to her.

5. The Greeks of Beaubien Street  (The Greektown Stories Series) by Suzanne Jenkins is pretty much marketed as a mystery, but it reads more like a family saga – the family dynamics of the Greek-American Zamos Family) which was very interesting. When it came to the mystery aspect, it was a bit overshadowed by the other plotline of the book. Jill Zamos is a homicide detective from Detroit who has to solve the murder of Gretchen Parker and she does that with the help of her colleague and friend, Albert Wong, and her visions. I was pretty disappointed that the mystery was not the focus of the story and it wasn’t clear enough for me who actually killed the girl. This book also has some disturbing scenes, so be aware if you are a sensitive person.

6. Chiriaș la Cluj (Fiziologii extrase dintr-un jurnal) by Marius Oliviu Iacob is the Romanian contemporary story of a middle-aged man called Hipolit Sterea (or Hip as his friends call him) who lives a pretty miserable life due to its low wedges from the publishing house where he works. He blogs about real estate as a hobby and writes funny stories online, but his dream is to write a book and his friend Oli (Oliviu) is willing to support and help him make his wish come true. Hip is the type of person who doesn’t seem to blend in anywhere, that’s why he rents his apartment from Cluj and becomes a tenant himself. To be honest, besides a few jokes and literary hints here and there, this book lacked everything I love in a book, including a plot and likeable characters.

These are the series I’m not planning to finish now or anytime in the near future. I will also write an article about the series I might continue, but until then, I would like to know which series you’ve quit or want to abandon.

Review: Dawn of Rebellion by Michelle Lynn

Book 1 of Dawn of Rebellion

                                                           

Title: Dawn of Rebellion

Author: Michelle Lynn

Genre: Adventure, Dystopia, Young Adult

Year of Publication: 2013

Published by Creativia

Series: Dawn of Rebellion

Rating: 3/5 stars

Ever since I’ve begun writing book reviews, I heard about books and genres which are popular among different categories of readers. Because I’m a curious person, I’m experimenting with various genres to discover what I like and what is not quite my cup of tea. Therefore; today I’m going to review the first instalment in Michelle Lynn’s young adult dystopian adventure trilogy entitled Dawn of Rebellion, which was sent to me by the author through Twitter.

In short, this is the story of two teenage sisters (Dawn and Gabby) who live in a dystopian and segregated version of London, where soldiers march on the streets, people are divided into three classes of citizens, and if you’re breaking the law, you are sent to the colonies to work in some kind of concentration camps. There, you are tortured or put to death in “the box” which made me think of a gas chamber. After Gabby steals a bracelet for her sister’s birthday and the authorities decide to send her to the colonies, Dawn along with Gabby’s boyfriend (Drew) embark on a risky journey to save Gabby. The adventures that await all three teens will shape both sisters and teach each one of them to develop sides of their personalities they didn’t know they had. They will also meet new friends and discover secrets buried in their past.

Though I have a complicated relationship with young adult novels, I admire the strong devotion and love the two sisters have for each other despite their totally opposed personalities: Dawn is quiet and studious, while Gabby is outgoing, confident and stubborn. The memories they have of their childhood and parents made me sad and sorry for the abandonment from their parents’ part and the way those memories are narrated broke my heart. This novel also gave me some strange vibe because of the constant presence of the soldiers, the gloomy atmosphere and pure terror lurking in the shadows. I found the adventures interesting, suspenseful and very realistic with all the beatings and the story of how the US lost its identity. The writing was pretty good, though I had some trouble understanding some British words I’ve never heard before.

The story is narrated through three perspectives (Dawn, Gabby and Drew) of which I personally preferred Gabby’s because she is more independent, stronger and more courageous than Dawn, but Dawn learns to get out of her comfort zone too with Drew’s and her new friends’ help. When it comes to romance, it’s not really the focus of the story, but this doesn’t mean that it’s non-existent. The thing that I didn’t particularly like was the moment when Drew couldn’t make up his mind who he really loved – Dawn or Gabby?

In the end, I have some mixed feeling about this book and about dystopias in general because they are not something I particularly enjoy reading, but, on the other hand, the author did a pretty good job depicting both the oppressive fictional British regime and the Texan rebels who still called themselves Americans.